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Sunday, 7 December 2014

BRILLIANTLY UNUSUAL TOP



BRILLIANTLY UNUSUAL TOP

One look at this confusingly beautiful top and I knew it had to be one I had to try.. and as I have this absolutely stunning Ice Baby Batik yarn handy.. how can I resist this creation.  J
I am so happy you’ve joined me here to work on this together – so get set for some fun.

Now if you have a self striped yarn, this will make our stripes that much simpler – else the designer has cleverly used one colour per row (or a set of rows) in a pretty arbitrary way.  So let’s have fun with this brilliant creation.

Though I’ve worked this in self striping yarn, and the designer has either (also) used self striping yarn, or changed yarns every other row, I feel that this construction is so beautiful  that the unusual-ness will show through even with a single colour yarn.

I’ve  got a few more beautiful and unusual top patterns already written – so let me add a few links here for your easy reference.

This is not my original pattern  and it’s just one of those wonderful free floating freebies over the net.  I am, as usual, writing down my notes, and am sharing them with you.  J

Now about this lovely yarn –ICE Batik is a really nice yarn – soft and smooth, sport 5-ply yarn (12 wpi) , and a US 4 / 3.5mm crochet hook has been recommended. 
To compare with our Indian yarns , this is a little thicker than our Indian Vardhaman baby soft - probably a little like our Vardhaman Millenium.
For cotton yarns, you could probably equate it with our Indian Laura cotton. 

For this pattern though, a lighter yarn would also work perfectly – so our Indian Anchor, Red rose or Red heart yarns would probably show the stitch detail perfectly J

As I was nearly finishing this pattern, I happened to show the w.i.p to a friend, and she said she had some link(s) for this pattern.. so here goes with those links as well
So whatever works..  yaay!
Materials used : ICE Baby Batik  ~ 250 gms , with a 4 mm crochet hook
About this lovely yarn : ICE Batik is a really nice yarn – soft and smooth, sport 5-ply yarn (12 wpi) , and a US 4 / 3.5mm crochet hook has been recommended. 
To compare with our Indian yarns , this is a little thicker than our Indian Vardhaman baby soft - probably a little like our Vardhaman Millenium.
For Indian cotton yarns, you could probably equate it with our Indian Laura cotton. 

Size made : Chest : 40” : Length : 27”
Gauge : 4 dc (across) x 2 dc row (high) = 1”

Skill level : Intermediate to Advanced

Stitches used :
fsc : Foundation Single Crochet : To refresh your skill on the fsc, please view this superb video by Tamara Kelly at the link  http://www.mooglyblog.com/foundation-single-crochet-fsc/

Chainless dc start : Instead of the usual start with ch 2 or ch 3,I’d like to introduce a lovely way of starting a double crochet row.  Do take a look at this self explanatory super video
In case you are unhappy with this start, or do not like it, do continue with the usual ch-2 or ch-3 start.  However, all instructions will be given assuming that you are using this chainless dc start.

dc 5-tog : Double crochet 5-tog : [yo, insert hk in st or ch-sp, yo and pull up a lp ; yo and draw through 2 lps] 5 times (6 lps on hk) ; yo, draw through all lps on hk.  One dc 5-tog made.


Abbreviations used :
lp(s) : Loop(s)                                                              sc : Single crochet
dc : Double crochet                                                     sp : Space                                           
sl-st : Slip stitch                                                            fsc : Foundation Single Crochet
st(s) : Stitch(es)                                                           hk : Hook
yo : Yarn Over                                                            ch : Chain
dc 5-tog : Double Crochet 5-together

Instructions : (Using U.S terminology)
Make two (one each for front and back)

So before we start on this unusual creation, let’s quickly look at what we’re going to do.  We start at the waist line and work our way to the shoulders.  The pattern is the same for front and back.. so all we’ve got to do is figure out one side, and we’re halfway there !  Our pattern is worked side to side, and one triangle at a time.  Come along and we’ll see how this beauty slowly unfolds .. not an easy one, but then as that famous saying goes.. No pain.. No gain! J

Start : Our stitch repeat here is 8 + 1.  Start with the number of fsc needed for your waist.  Turn.

Row 1 : dc in each dc till end.  Turn

Row 2 : sc in the 1st  dc ; sk next 2 dc, dc 5-tog in the next dc ; (ch 2, dc 5-tog in the next dc ); rep (to) once  ; sk next 2 dc , sc in next dc* ; rep (to) once ; sk next dc, sc in next dc* ; rep *to* till end.  Turn.

Row 3 : dc in the 1st sc ; *ch 3, sk 1st dc 5-tog , sk next ch-2 sp, sc on next dc 5-tog ; ch 3, sk next ch-2 sp , sk next dc 5-tog , dc in next sc* ; rep *to* till end.  Turn.

Row 4 : sc in the 1st st , sl-st in the next 12 sts ; 3 sc in next ch-3 sp and sc in next st ; 3 hdc in the next ch-3 sp and hdc in next st ; *3 dc in next ch-3 sp , dc in next dc* ; rep *to* till end.  Turn.

Row  5 : dc in the 1st dc ; dc in each dc till the the last 8 dc ; hdc in the next 4 dc ; sc in the next 4 dc.  Turn.

Row  6 : sl-st in the 1st 11 sts ; sc in the next dc ;
*sk next 2 dc, dc 5-tog in the next dc ; (ch 2, dc 5-tog in the next dc)  rep (to) once ; sk next 2 dc , sc in next dc* ; rep *to* till end.  Turn.

Row  7 : dc in the 1st sc ; *ch 3, sk 1st dc 5-tog , sk next ch-2 sp, sc on next dc 5-tog ; ch 3, sk next ch-2 sp , sk next dc 5-tog , dc in next sc* ; rep *to* till last dc 5-tog set , ending with a sc on the last dc 5-tog. Turn.

Row  8 : sc in the 1st sc ; 3 sc in the next ch-3 sp ; sc in the next dc ; 3 hdc in the next ch-3 sp ; hdc in the next sc ; *3 dc in next ch-3 sp ; dc in the next dc* ; rep *to* till end. Turn

Row  9 : dc in the 1st dc ; dc in each dc till the last 8 dc ; hdc in the next 4 dc ; sc in the next 4 dc.  Turn.

Row  10: sl-st in the 1st 11 sts ; sc in the next dc ;
*sk next 2 dc, dc 5-tog in the next dc ; (ch 2, dc 5-tog in the next dc)  rep (to) once ; sk next 2 dc , sc in next dc* ; rep *to* till end.  Turn.

Row  11 : dc in the 1st sc ; *ch 3, sk 1st dc 5-tog , sk next ch-2 sp, sc on next dc 5-tog ; ch 3, sk next ch-2 sp , sk next dc 5-tog , dc in next sc* ; rep *to* till last dc 5-tog set , ending with a sc on the last dc 5-tog. Turn.

Row  12  : sc in the 1st sc ; 3 sc in the next ch-3 sp ; sc in the next dc ; 3 hdc in the next ch-3 sp ; hdc in the next sc ; *3 dc in next ch-3 sp ; dc in the next dc* ; rep *to* till end. Turn

Row  13 : sl st in the 1st dc ; sl-st in each dc till the 1st hdc ; ch 4, sk next 4 hdc, hdc in next 2 sc ; ch 3, sk next 3 sts, hdc in next sc ; 2 hdc in next ch-2 sp ; (hdc on next dc 5-tog ; hdc in next 7 sts ; ch 1, sk next st ,  hdc in next st) ; [ch 2, sk next 2 sts, hdc in next st ; hdc in next 5 sts ; ch 3, sk next 3 sts ; hdc in next st] ; 2 hdc in next ch 2 sp ; rep (to) once ; rep [to] once ; ch 3, sk next 3 sts , sc in next st ; sl-st in each sl-st till end.  Turn.

We’ve completed one part of this wonderful pattern.  You have a lovely triangle shaped project – so as you’ve figured, we’re going to work on the next part of this triangle to make it into a rectangle.  We’ll thus be working one triangle at a time, to give our project its really unusual look.  Good job so far !

Now we’ve got to do the mirror image of this triangle to make the pattern into a rectangle.
Row 16 is the row of the dc 5-tog sets, and that is going to form the count off row for us from here for this triangle pattern set.   Each of our dc 5-tog sets is the full set of 3.

Row  14 : dc in 1st st ; dc in each st and ch-sp till end.  Turn.
Note : If there is a ch-3 sp, do 3 dc in that ; 4 dc in ch-4 sps etc. Also remember that you should have the same number of stitches that you started Row 1 at the end of this row.

Row  15 : dc in each dc till end.  Turn.

Row  16 : Rep Row 2

Row 17  : Rep Row 3

Row 18  : dc in the 1st dc ; *3 dc in next ch-3 sp , dc in next dc* ; rep *to* till last 21 sts (or the sc in the 3rd dc 5-tog set from end) ;  hdc in the next sc ; 3 hdc in the next ch-3 sp ; sc in next dc ; 3 sc in next ch-3 sp.  Turn.

Row  19 : sl-st in the 1st 8 sts (so the 4 sc and 4 hdc) ; sc in the next 4 dc ; hdc in the next 4 dc ; dc in each dc till end.  Turn.

Row  20 : sc in 1st dc ; *sk next 2 dc, dc 5-tog in the next dc ; (ch 2, dc 5-tog in the next dc)  rep (to) once ; sk next 2 dc , sc in next dc* ; rep *to* till last 4 dc. Turn.
So this is a repeat of Row 6, in reverse.  See how many dc 5-togs you have in that row.  You should have the same number here too.

Row  21 : sl-st in the 1st sc and ch-2 sp ; sc in the next sc (i.e on top of the dc 5-tog) ; ch 3, sk next dc 5-tog, dc in the next sc ; *ch 3, sk next dc 5-tog , sk next ch-2 sp, sc on next dc 5-tog ; ch 3, sk next ch-2 sp , sk next dc 5-tog , dc in next sc* ; rep *to* till end. Turn.

Row  22  : dc in the 1st dc ; *3 dc in next ch-3 sp ; dc in the next dc* ; rep *to* till you’re 12 sts from end (i.e you have 2 ch-sps before end and the 4 sl-sts– or the middle sc of the second last dc 5-tog set) ; hdc in next sc ; 3 hdc in next ch-3 sp ; sc in next st ; 3 sc in next ch-3 sp. Turn

Row  23  : sl-st in the 1st 8 sts (i.e 4 sc and 4 hdc) ; sc in the next 4 sts ; hdc in the next 4 sts ; dc in each dc till end.  Turn.

Row  24 : sc in the 1st dc ; *sk next 2 dc, dc 5-tog in the next dc ; (ch 2, dc 5-tog in the next dc)  rep (to) once ; sk next 2 dc , sc in next dc* ; rep *to* till last 4 dc from end.  Turn.
This is  a repeat of Row 10, in reverse.  So check how many dc 5-togs you have in that row. You should have the same number here too.

Row 25 : sl-st in the 1st sc ; sl in ch-2 sp and sc on top of the dc 5-tog ; ch 3, sk next ch-2 sp and dc 5-tog, dc in next sc ; *ch 3, sk next dc 5-tog , sk next ch-2 sp, sc on next dc 5-tog ; ch 3, sk next ch-2 sp , sk next dc 5-tog , dc in next sc* ; rep *to* till end. Turn.

Row  26 : dc in the 1st dc ; *3 dc in next ch-3 sp ; dc in the next dc ; 3 dc in next ch-3 sp ; dc in the next sc * ; rep *to* till 12 sts from end (ie 2 ch-sps and the sl-sts) ; hdc in the next 4 sts, sc in the next 4 sts, sk the sl-sts. Turn

Row  27 : sl st in the 1st 8 sts ; sc in next 4 sts ; hdc in the next 4 sts, dc in each dc till end.  Turn.

This row is a little tricky to write out – mainly because our starting stitch counts vary.  However, we know what we’ve got to do, right?  We’ve got our 2nd triangle almost done, and have the last 2 rows to complete the triangle.
Now to bring the length of an sl-st up to a dc, we need a dc over it ; to bring the sc up to a dc length, we need an hdc over it, and to bring the length of an hdc up to a dc, we need an sc over it.  Got it?

Row  28 : sl-st in each dc ; sc over each hdc and hdc over every sc and dc over every sl-st all through this row.  Turn.

OK.. so not sure how you’ve managed, but I’m not too happy with this 2nd triangle here.. and now I see why the designer has just drawn straight lines (right side of chart on top) instead of indicating which sts .. hmm..
So here’s what I’m going to do.  I’m just going to go ahead and adjust this next row with stitches of different heights – starting with a double treble and then a treble stitch and slowly reducing heights of my stitches, till I end with an sl-st at the end… and hopefully I’ll get a rectangle. Now as you do your 1st stitches on one end, put your work down often and check that the rectangle is forming.
Sorry, I really don’t like the sound of this bit of instruction.. just can’t see how I can write it any better … we’re all starting with different counts L

Oh, you could, as designer has suggested, do the ‘tweak row’ here on Row 28, and then do a nice neat row of dc’s in Row 29 too.

The one thing you need to remember is that in Row 2, the instructions read in next dc and you may not have a dc at that spot, you may have tweaked and have a trc or an sc.  To avoid this, you could do as suggested above, and do you ‘tweak’ row in Row 28, so you have all dc’s in Row 29.

Row  29 : If you have a rectangle of the proper size by Row 28, then this row is dc in each st till end.  If like me, your rectangle needs tweaking, then tweak away till you get a rectangle that we can work with.

Great.. that worked.. Yaay ! It looks beautiful !!

So your pattern repeat is Rows 2 through to 29.  Go all the way to the neckline, with no alterations or decreases for the armholes. 

For the shoulders I’m going to cheat once again and rather than do all the tedious calculations for the triangles, I’m going to reduce when I reach the dc rows at the end of one block (or triangle), and then continue decreases only with dc rows. 
The beauty of this pattern by designer, is that there are only decreases for the neck, and the armhole does not need reducing or decreases.. so once you’ve reached here, we’re at the easy peasy bit!

So for eg, if you’ve reached the length you need for your top at the end of Row 29, instead of starting on Row 2, continue with dc rows through, and do only a shoulder bit, turning off for the neckline, and then continue with dc rows till you have a little neckline scooped out.  Once you’ve completed one side of your shoulder / neckline ; re-fasten yarn and duplicate for the other shoulder… and c’est tout ! We’re done!




Repeat this for the other side as well.. fasten your shoulder and sides together – the armhole magically works out, and we’re completely done. 
Oh, just to even things out, I ran a row of sc all around the neck and armhole edges – an optional for you.

Fasten off then and weave in the ends.. and go ahead, slip on your lovely and superbly unusual top on and show off.. you deserve to! J

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Have a great day and see you soon. J