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Monday, 6 April 2015

SHIFA’S TOP

 
SHIFA’S TOP

I was working on a skirt and just as I was completing that and wondered what I’d make next.. and blam ! (and a lovely blam at that!) .. this lovely pattern fell straight into my lap (or laptop?).  Thank you Rajeshwari for sharing this. 

So before you wonder, I've just made one top in black - but to show off the stitch detail, I've had my model wear it with a black as well as white undershirt.


Inspired by this pattern, I’ve written down my notes, and I’d like to share that with you.

Materials used : For today’s lovely project,  I’ve used about 3 (100 gm) balls of the lovely Indian Red Rose knitting cotton yarn,  with a 2.5 mm crochet hook to make a 34-36” sized top.

Abbreviations used :
fdc : Foundation double crochet                                dc : Double crochet
ch : chain                                                                        ch-sp : chain space
sp : space                                                                        rep : Repeat
trc : Treble / Triple crochet

Stitches used :
fdc : Foundation Double Crochet : This is a unique way of starting a project directly with a row of double crochet stitches.  This makes your whole project neat and even.. in a way that you need to do once, to agree!  If you are familiar with fsc, you’ll wonder why you never used this start before !

Chainless dc start : Instead of the usual start with ch 2 or ch 3, I’d like to introduce this lovely new way of starting a dc row.  Do take a look at this self explanatory super video http://www.mooglyblog.com/chainless-starting-double-crochet/
In case you are unhappy with this start, or do not like it, do continue with the usual ch-2 or ch-3 start.  However, all instructions will be given assuming that you are using the chainless dc start.

Chainless Treble crochet : A really lovely way to start a row of stitches without the ch 3 / ch 4 start.. this is the chainless treble crochet.  This unique way of starting makes your project even - in a way that needs to be seen for you to agree with me.  Do visit the self explanatory link to learn this fascinating new start. 
In case you are unhappy with this start, or do not like it, do continue with the usual ch-3 or ch-4 start.  However, all instructions will be given assuming that you are using the chainless dc start.

Treble / Triple crochet 2-together : trc 2-tog : Now this stitch is used in two different ways in this pattern . The first usage is used with trc over 2 sts, and in the second it is a 2-tog stitch in the same space or st.


Instructions : (Using U.S terminology)

Quick analysis of what we’re going to do here today.  Take a look at the picture below (my inspiration) so we’re on the same page.  There are two parts to this top – the vest and then the lovely ornate, lacy border. (The “border” part has two patterns).
So depending on how long you want this, measure yourself (or the person for whom this top is intended) around the waist (or just slightly above waist) where we will be starting with the trc rows for the vest.  We will work upwards to the neck and shoulders in simple plain trc rows.  Once the top of the vest is complete, we will come back down to this start fdc row / round and then work out border.

Calculations : So the usual quandary, how do I calculate how many rows I need to get the desired length.. so here’s what I suggest.  Work one trc row, calculate the “height” / width of this row and then see if you’d manage to reach the armhole by say 7 trc rows (going by the picture below). If you do, then you’re vest / top is going to be like that in the picture below, and if that’s what you intended .. then we’re home free.

Widths of the two border parts : Now what I’ve done is divide my project into 3 from the armhole down (to the length I need for the vest), and then worked an equal 1/3rd per pattern.  i.e the plain trc part is 1/3rd, then the Border Pattern 1 is the next 1/3rd and finally that lovely pineapple Border Pattern 2 makes up the last 1/3rd

Now the top part of the vest is this simple trc, and then we have that lovely pineapple border Border 2) , and that bit has a pattern repeat of 28. So now you have all the numbers we need….

This pattern is worked the same way for front and back, so we need to work 2 similar parts.

Now usually to get a good fit, one should work 2 parts and the neatly join along the sides – this way one can also decrease neatly to get a good side shape.  However, I know crocheters who have worked in rounds and managed neatly to decrease along the sides and get as good a shape too. So let’s get started.  I am assuming though that we’re working two parts and joining them so we’ll be turning at the end of each row.

Row 1 : Start with a multiple of 28 fdc. Turn.

Row 2 : trc in the 1st dc ; trc in each dc till end.  Turn.

Row 3 : trc in the 1st trc ; trc in each trc till end.  Turn.


Rep Row 3 till your project reaches the armhole. 

Now there is no chart for the arm hole decrease… so here’s what I am planning on doing.. I’m going to sl-st into the first 9 trc and then trc all the way till the last 9 trc and then turn.
In the next row, I will once again reduce 2 trc each end, and thereafter continue till you reach the neckline.

For the neckline, I’ve worked from the armhole side till the centre, dividing for neck after say 15 trc (or as many sts needed for the width of the strap).  I then worked a few rows just on these few sts, till I had a strap and neckline of the length needed.
Fasten off and weave in ends.

Join your yarn at the other edge of the neckline row, and then mirror the strap bit for that end too.  Fasten off and weave in ends again.

The top bit of your vest is complete.  We now have two more pattern bits to complete the bottom part of your vest.  So for the bottom border, I will divide it into Border Pattern 1 and Border Pattern 2.

Border Pattern 1 :
This part of the pattern is made up of ch-5 spaces.  Its just the first row that needs calculations to determine where the ch-5 sts go.
For this part, we will be going back to our 1st fdc row, and turning our work, we will be now working on the underside of the fdc row (so the neck / shoulder bits will now face away from you).

Now just a thought.. (and just to tweak and add a few choices / decisions and added *complications* ??), what we could also do is complete the two top halves of the top – then join these two bits up and then work the two border parts in a round .. hmm.  Just throwing an idea out there…

But as it looks like the designer has done it in two parts all through, this is how I am going to write out the pattern.

Row 1 : sc in the 1st fdc ; *ch 5, sk 2 fdc, sc in the next fdc* ; 
rep *to* till last 2 fdc ; ch 2, dc into the 1st sc. 
(This ensures that you are now in the centre of that last ch-5 sp).  Turn.

Row 2 : sc in the 1st ch-5 sp ; *ch 5, sc in the next ch-5 sp* ; 
rep *to* till last ch-5 sp ; ch 2, dc into the 1st sc. 
(This ensures that you are now in the centre of that last ch-5 sp).  Turn.


Rep Row 2 till you have a lacy 2nd border till desired.  The white photograph is the one done by the designer (or my inspiration) and the black one is mine.  So as you can see, you just adjust this section till you get the length / height you desire.  Of course this will also depend on the thickness of the yarn you're using.

Note : I’d advise here that you once again recalculate the length /width you will get with that last portion of border. One can always add to the length needed in this easy section – as that last border section will be fixed (in length addition I mean).

Right so away we go.. and we’ll catch up soon for that last border section.

Border Pattern 2 :
Now we come to the last and final part of our lovely top which starts with a row of sc.  At this point, you need to ensure that you have the pattern count repeat of 28 sts.


Note : In the chart below, Row 1 has not been shown, so if you’re following the chart as well as the written pattern below, the chart will be one row different from the write up.

Row 1 : 3 sc in the 1st ch-5 sp ; *sk next sc , 3 sc in the next ch-5 sp* ; 
rep *to* till end.  Turn.

Row 2 : dc in the 1st sc ; ch 1, sk next sc, dc in the next sc ; 
*ch 2, sk next  2 sc , dc in the next sc* ; 
rep *to* till end ; ch 1, dc in the last sc.  Turn.

Row 3 : dc in the 1st dc ; dc in the next ch-1 sp ; dc in the next dc ; 
*ch 5, sk next  2 dc and ch-sps , 2 sc in the next ch-2 sp ; (sc in the next dc, 2 sc in the next ch-2 sp) ; rep (to) 2 times  {i.e a total of 11 scs} ; ch 5, sk next 2 dc and ch-sps , [dc in the next dc, 2 dc in the next ch-2 sp ; dc in the next dc]* ; 
rep *to* till 2nd last dc ; dc in that 2nd last dc ; dc in the ch-1 sp ; dc in the last dc.  Turn.

Row 4 : dc in the 1st dc ; ch 1, dc in the next dc ; 2 dc in the next dc ;
*ch 5, sk 1st sc ,  sc in next 9 sc ; ch 5, sk next sc , [2 dc in next dc , dc in next dc ; ch 1, dc in next dc ; 2 dc in next dc]* ; 
rep *to* till end.  Turn.

Row 5 : dc in the 1st dc ; ch 5, dc in the next 3 dc ;
*ch 5, sk 1st sc ,  sc in next 7 sc ; [ch 5, dc in the next 3 dc ; ch 5, dc in the next ch-1 sp ; ch 5, dc in the next 3 dc]* ; 
rep *to* till end.  Turn.

Row 6 : sc in the 1st dc ; ch 4, sc in the next ch-5 sp ; ch 3, dc in next 3 dc ;
*ch 5, sk 1st sc ,  sc in next 5 sc ; ch 5, dc in the next 3 dc ; ch 3, sc in the next ch-5 sp ; ch 7, sc in the next ch-5 sp ; ch 3, dc in the next 3 dc* ; rep *to* till end.  Turn.
{In last rep, do ch 4 and sc in last dc as you did with start of this row}

Now in the chart below, the stitch looks like a dtr (double treble stitch), but in the project made, it looks like a trc has been used.  As in the following rows, there is a trc 2-tog (and a dtr 2-tog is a pretty confusing stitch), I am going to opt for the trc all through.  That said, you have a choice of stitches for the rows that follow.. either the dtr or the trc.

Row 7 : ch 5, 8 trc in next ch-4 sp ; ch 3, dc in the next 3 dc ;
*ch 5, sk 1st sc ,  sc in next 3 sc ; ch 5, dc in the next 3 dc ; ch 3, 16 trc in the next ch-7 sp ; ch 3, dc in the next 3 dc* ; rep *to* till end.  Turn.
{In last rep, do ch 5 and 8 trc in last ch-sp , ending with trc in the last st ; as you did with start of this row}

Row 8 : trc in the 1st st ; ch 1, [trc 2-tog over the next 2 trc ; ch 3,] ; rep [to] 3 times over the next 6 trc ; dc in the next 3 dc ;
*sk next 3 sc , dc in the next 3 dc ; rep [to] 8 times over the next 16 trc ; dc in the next 3 dc* ; 
rep *to* till end.  Turn.
{In last rep, rep [to] 4 times over the last 8 trc ; ch 1, ending with trc in the last st ; as you did with start of this row}

In this row, we will have 2 sets of trc 2-tog that works as one st and as this is a little complicated, please follow with the pattern chart below.

Row 9 : trc in the 1st st ; ch 2 , 2 trc 2-tog over the next 2 ch-sps ; ch 5, [2 trc 2-tog over the same last ch-s and the next ch-sp] ; (ch 5, rep [to] once) ; sk next 2 ch-sps and 2 sets of 3 dc’s , rep (to) once ;
*rep (to) 6 times ; sk next 2 ch-sps and 2 sets of 3 dc’s , rep (to) once* ; rep *to* till end.  Turn.
{In last rep, rep (to) 3 times over the last 4 trc 2-tog ; ch 2, ending with trc in the last st ; as you did with start of this row}

Last row : sc in the 1st st ; 2 sc in the next ch-2 sp ; *sk next trc 2-tog , 3 sc , ch 3, 3 sc* ;
rep *to* till end ; 2 sc in the last ch-2 sp ; sc in the last sc. 

Fasten off and weave in ends.

Superb.  You’ve completed one side of your top.  Rep for the other side and then join sides.

Finishing : It is always better to do one round of sc or hdc around the armholes and neckline – so go ahead and do just that.  You could also add a row of picot all round, if you like.

And if you’d like a refresher on “how to do a picot stitch”, here you go https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6GGlzZZl3I8

… and we’re done ! You’ve created something beautiful. 

Enjoyed this ? I’m sure you did and are really happy with your creation too.

If you're visiting me here for the first time, and have liked the experience, do add me to your mailing list (for your convenience) , and all my future free patterns will come straight to your mail box.  

I’d appreciate if you could credit my blog (and link the original pattern link) when you make your own project.  Thanks.


Have a great day and see you soon. J

I have a few top patterns I’ve written up, so here’s a dekho… J